This Frequently Asked Question page is meant to provide answers to mostly asked questions in the area of Next Generation Internet (NGI). The page is being updated when new questions (and answers) will be available. The questions are grouped into sections by theme:

  • Next Generation Internet – NGI – in general;
  • NGI interactive map;
  • NGI Workshops;
  • NGI Contact Points; and
  • Project phase.

 Next Generation Internet – NGI – in general

1. What is the Next Generation Internet - NGI?

The Next Generation Internet (NGI), a key priority in H2020 ICT work programme 2018-2020 (WP2018-20), will ensure a more human-centric Internet supporting European values of openness, cooperation across borders, decentralisation, inclusiveness, transparency and protection of privacy.

In the WP 2018-20 the name ‘NGI’ is used as a ‘NGI Key Priority’ covering 8 calls with different topics. The ‘NGI Key Priority’ covers the work that is done in the areas of Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Future media, Interactive technologies, Language technologies and inclusion.

NGI is also used for one of these topics within this ‘NGI Key Priority’. This topic will have the title ‘Next Generation Internet – An Open Internet Initiative’. It complements the technology oriented topics (Privacy and trust enhancing technologies, Decentralized data governance and Discovery and identification technologies) with an agile and dynamic approach to Research and Innovation (R&I) in the Internet. To be agile and dynamic, this topic will use cascading grants to especially support individual teams of researchers or startups in short research cycles with a clear aim to quickly bring research results to the market.

All the topics under the ‘NGI Key Priority’ share the common vision of the human centric internet while each one focuses on a certain technology area or, in the case of the NGI Topic, on a new approach to Internet research.

Please note that the remaining of this FAQ focuses on the new approach to Internet research that is implemented in the NGI topic with the title ‘Next Generation Internet – An open Internet initiative’. When in this FAQ we refer to the overall ‘NGI Key Priority’, it will be indicated explicitly.

2. What are the three main areas of the NGI?

NGI proposed a new approach to Internet research (agile and dynamic using cascading grants) that can be applied to any technology area under NGI.

For the WP 2018, we have selected three areas that will be focus of the initial activities:

  • Privacy and trust enhancing technologies
  • Decentralized data governance; and
  • Discovery and identification technologies.

In addition, we will launch in the coming months an open consultation to select three additional areas where the NGI activities of the NGI call in autumn 2019 will focus on. This reflects that it is important to become active NOW, especially to engage the relevant stakeholders to take an active part in the NGI ecosystem to shape the future internet further.

3. What is the NGI relation to other initiatives/programmes (e.g. 5G PPP, NetWorld2020 etc.)?

Obviously, communication networks are a critical component of any future Internet development. However, for the remaining of H2020 this area has already defined its own R&I roadmap under the 5G PPP. This is the reason why networks are not currently included under the ‘NGI Key Priority’ but it remains as an own ‘5G Key Priority’ in the current WP 2018-20 which covers several calls related to 5G. So far, 5G and the ‘NGI Key Priority’ will be separate initiatives in H2020. For the next framework programme it could be considered to integrate them under the NGI initiative, even if it is still too early to say. The same applies to big data or computing infrastructures. We will promote collaboration and sharing of information.

4. Why does it take time to make/prepare a flagship initiative?

Most of the ICT initiatives in H2020 are based on roadmap based R&I. This implies that in the early phase of the programme some commitments are made already for the next years (e.g. 5G PPP). The WP 2018-20 was the first possibility to implement the ‘NGI initiative’ by aligning the ‘NGI vision’ to those technology areas that are now under the ‘NGI Key Priority’; and by launching the ‘Next Generation Internet – An open Internet initiative’ as a new approach to Internet research (agile and dynamic using cascading grants).

5. What are those centres in the NGI implementation (WP2018-2020) slide (page 10)?

The centres in the slide correspond to the three NGI areas selected for the WP 2018 (as explained in the answer to question 2 above). As it is also indicated there, for the WP 2019 three new areas will be selected in an open consultation process (indicated in the slide as ‘???’), so we still do not know which areas these will be.

The update to the WP 2019 where the three new areas will be indicated will be published after the summer 2018. The suggestions for these NGI centres will come from the stakeholders – this shows that the NGI approach is a stakeholder-bottom-up-driven approach.

NGI interactive map (https://map.hub4ngi.eu/map/)

6. What kind of actors are needed on the map?

Key projects and actors relevant to NGI should include:  Research centres, National public research funding organisations, SMEs, Start-ups, NGOs, Corporates, Incubators, Accelerators, Investors, Influencers, Co-working spaces, etc.

7. What is my benefit (as an actor) to add my company/organisation on the NGI Map?

The NGI online map will help fostering collaborations amongst all active the researchers and innovators in Europe and beyond, including research centers, national public research funding organizations, SMEs, start-ups, non-government organisations (NGOs), corporations, incubators, accelerators, investors, influencers, co-working spaces, and more.

The NGI map brings many advantages to participants:

  • Benefit from a marketing channel to promote their work and expertise (=increased visibility and reach)
  • Indicate willingness to be part of a totally new initiative for the development of the future Internet
  • Be able to shape and refine the NGI R&D agenda, planned activities and instruments
  • Be part of a true pan-European partnership: national – EU – international
  • Participate in the NGI activities by fostering collaborations with top-notch players.

The map provides users with the core information they need to better reach all the active stakeholders in the European NGI ecosystem, including their contact details, a short introduction to their organization, an overview of their business activities (if relevant), as well as information about projects and initiatives they are involved in. It is designed to encourage and facilitate collaborations and participation in the NGI initiative.

8. Who will add the data on the NGI map?

Each of the actors adds and then will be able to update/edit their own data.

9. How to add the data?

You can find “ADDING AN NGI ACTOR” on the NGI Map help page at: https://www.hub4ngi.eu/map-help/ with steps as follows:

  1. To add a new actor, click on the 3 horizontal lines on the top left corner of the map.
  2. This opens up the left sidebar. To add the actor, click on the “Add” option from the top menu of the sidebar.
  3. Fill in the details of the actor. You may add projects that the actor is involved in, by clicking on the “Add Project” button.
  4. After filling in the actor details, click on the “Submit” button at the bottom. You will receive a confirmation email in the email address you have provided. The actor will appear on the map after it has been moderated by a representative of the HUB4NGI project.
10. How to edit the data on the NGI map?

Registered actors will receive an automated confirmation email that contains a unique editing link. By clicking on this link, actors are taken to the map submission form, where they can edit their previously submitted data.

11. How to find an organisation/company on the map?

The HUB4NGI project is currently building a search function, which will allow finding an actor by their name, their type, or the projects that they are involved in. Alternatively, users may click on the “NGI Community” option from the top menu of the sidebar to see the list of actors already registered on the map. Selecting an actor type will show a list of the registered actors.

NGI Workshops

12. Must the NGI Contact Point(s) pay the traveling expenses of the EC speaker attending the workshop in the MSs/ACs?

No.

13. What is the mechanism and how involved actors can in practice influence on NGI topics?

Influence the NGI topics by:

  • registering in the NGI map
  • follow the NGI initiative on twitter @NGI4eu and be always up-to-date via our interactive NGI Futurium page
  • taking part in the open consultation process and ‘have your say’
  • take part in relevant NGI workshops/events
  • provide us you views, e.g. write your statement papers and publish them on Futurium
  • stay in close contact with your NGI contact points
14. What concretely will be done based on the workshop results?

The activities will be backed by the HUB4NGI Support Action who has appointed a rapporteur specifically for this task (Mr Timo Lahnalampi, timo.lahnalampi@martel-innovate.com; fif-support@hub4ngi.eu). The NGI Contact Point liaises with the rapporteur about the developments. A final report on all activities will be issued by the rapporteur end of 2017.

The outcomes of the workshops will help the EC to shape the future Internet and to implement these outcomes especially in the NGI (long-term) roadmap, which means in particular first of all they will help us for the topics in the short research cycles of the NGI call 2018 of the WP 2018-20, the further NGI centres/topics of the WP2018-20 (call 2019), the next Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF 2021-2027 (FP9)) and other actions.

Funding

15. What is/are the NGI topic number(s) in the WP2018-2020?

Possible funding for NGI in the WP 2018-2020 = NGI initiative (WP text will be published in October):

ICT-24 2018: Next Generation Internet – An Open Internet Initiative

Research & Innovation actions: 21.5 Mio. EUR

  • Privacy and trust enhancing technologies
  • Decentralized data governance
  • Discovery and identification

Coordination and support actions: 7.0 Mio. EUR

  • Technology Strategy & Policy
  • Technology Harvest & Transfer
  • Outreach Office

ICT-24 2019: Next Generation Internet – An Open Internet Initiative

Research&Innovation actions: 21.5 Mio. EUR

  • Topics/ centres to be announced in autumn 2018

ICT-31 2018: EU-US collaboration on NGI

Coordination and support actions: 2.5 Mio. EUR

ICT-31 2019: EU-US collaboration on NGI

Research&Innovation actions: 3.5 Mio. EUR

16. Who is eligible for funding?

Horizon 2020 list of countries and applicable rules for funding document is available at:
https://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/wp/2014_2015/annexes/h2020-wp1415-annex-a-countries-rules_en.pdf.

Questions related the general funding:

Contact the ICT National Contact points in your country: http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/support/national_contact_points.html

You should note that the implementation of the NGI projects using cascading grants establishes two types of beneficiaries:

  • Those running the R&I Actions (NGI centres) who will set the research agenda for the topic and will launch the calls for third party projects
  • The third parties (sub-grantees) who will implement the research. Here there is a focus on top researchers, hi-tech startups and SMEs who have the capacity to set the course of Internet evolution.
17. When funding will be available?

Funding will be available in future calls:

Calls of the WP 2018-20:

  • NGI call 2018: 31 Oct 2017 (RIAs + CSAs)
  • NGI call 2019: 16 Oct 2018 (RIAs)

To get to know more about the ICT-LEIT work programme 2018-20 and especially the NGI Calls you could participate (or follow online) the ICT Proposers Day 2017 that will take place on 9 and 10 November in Budapest.

You can also get information from your NCP (National Contact Point). To find the NCPs please check the web-link at:
http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/support/national_contact_points.html

18. What the cascade funding does mean?

This scheme allows a part of the budget to be set aside by the consortium for third parties, entities that are not part of the consortium, through an Open Call for proposals or as a prize for a contest (inducement prize). Here, “Open” means “open to the public”: any entity fulfilling each call’s rules can apply.

This scheme allows direct support to individual organisations (a research team, a startup, etc.). It does not require a consortium of at least three partners. It is a more agile and dynamic process that can be implemented in small projects with short research cycles, which is better fit to Internet research.

19. When the 1st Open Call (cascade funding) will be launched (WP 2018-20)?

The plan for the first call (2018) is as follows: opening of the call on 31 October 2017; closing of the call on 17 April 2018; projects will start in autumn 2018. We engage them to implement a strategy to be active from day one on and to be immediately able to fund researchers/ hi-tech startups and their ideas/proposals through the system of cascading grants.

20. How funding will be managed?

For the funding procedures please see the visuals in the answer of question no. 15.

For the Research and Innovation (R&I) actions and the procedure of cascade funding:
In each of the Research & Innovation topics of the WP 2018-20 the Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of EUR 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. As a reference, 80% of the EU funding should be allocated to financial support to the third parties, through projects typically in the EUR 50 000 to 200 000[1] range with duration of 9 to 12 months. Each ‘R&I Action’ is expected to run several cycles of third party projects, which requires an overall duration of 24 to 36 months.

[1] In line with Article 23 (7) of the Rules for Participation the amounts referred to in Article 137 of the Financial Regulation may be exceeded, and if this is the case proposals should explain why this is necessary to achieve the objectives of the action.

NGI Contact Points

21. Is there any traveling reimbursement for the NGI-Contact Points (CP) attending the meetings/events?

This is stated in the NGI CP Terms of Reference (ToR):
“The NGI Contact Point’s role is on a voluntary basis, though the European Commission will be able to reimburse the expenses for travelling to meetings of the Future Internet Forum. Therefore it is imperative that he/she has certain discretionary financial resources and independence.”

Project phase

22. How Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) are handled in the project?

The IPRs are agreed between project consortium beneficiaries in the project Consortium Agreement (CA). To learn more about the Horizon 2020 rules regarding intellectual property, please read the related articles of Section 3 of the Annotated Model Grant Agreement.

On intellectual property issues, you can also turn to European IPR Helpdesk for assistance.

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